Building Bike Strength

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It’s very easy to get stuck in a rut on the bike. Most of us have a bike route; we do the route, and never deviate from said route. But that bike route is the very thing that is holding us back. Spending hours in the saddle each week, performing the same cycling workout is not the way to get better at the sport.

The reality is you must vary your training if your goal is to significantly increase your overall cycling strength. Your cycling training (just like your running and swimming), should incorporate a variety of different training elements, such as resistance training and high-intensity intervals, which will make you a faster, stronger cyclist and breathe new life into your workouts.

Here are some different cycling training ideas to help you gain strength:

Bike Hill Repeats (BHR)


This is a strength workout.  After a 12 to 20 minute warm-up, climb a hill seated with a comfortable effort, using a gear at 55-65rpm.  Focus on every degree of your pedal circle.  Repeat that climb three to six times with at least 90 seconds easy spin back down between each.

Tempo Riding

Tempo riding is just above aerobic training and just below endurance level. Tempo riding pace is not easy and would be difficult to sustain the required pace for hours, but doesn’t require so much effort that it tires you out quickly, and does require concentration to keep the pace up. A tempo workout should be performed at around 15 beats below your lactate threshold. A good tempo workout: Begin with an easy warmup for 10 to 20 minutes. Then increase your effort until you are in your tempo zone. Stay there for 10 minutes, and then cool down for three minutes. Then return to your tempo zone for 10 minutes, and cool down. Advanced riders can do three to five 10-minute intervals; or two 15 to 20 minute intervals.

Recovery Ride

This is an active recovery time.  This ride should take place eight to 20 hours after a challenging run or very tough ride.  It should take place on a flat ground, use easy gears and build your cadence slowly so you loosen up as you ride. It should be a very easy ride.  

For some additional tips, you can visit my blog at:  Build Bike Strength

Train Right,

Coach MJ

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MJ Gasik started competing in the sport of triathlon in 2003 and has completed 12 Ironman distance races including the World Championships in Kona, HI. MJ is a USAT Certified Coach, Ironman U Certified Coach, USMS Level 4 Certified Coach and is the founder and owner of Tri Right Coaching. MJ has coached hundreds of athletes from beginners through elite to personal bests in distances from sprint through Ironman.